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Bromley Reacts to "F" from SD1, Will OK Golf Carts on City Streets

The City of Bromley is expected to allow golf carts to be driven on city streets.

City council heard a first reading of the proposed ordinance on Wednesday. The ordinance, according to city attorney Kim Vocke, would require that the carts be inspected, that owners would pay a $75 fee, and that users possess a valid driver's license.

Violations could lead to fines ranging from $100 to $250, including for those who are not of legal driving age.

The new ordinance also applies only to city streets, which can be tricky in Bromley with multiple state routes running through. "They can cross state roads, but can't travel them," Vocke explained. 

Is this ordinance needed?

"I've seen several. I can probably count ten," said Mayor Donnie Jobe. 

"You sure they're not people from Devou Park who hit a bad shot?," joked Councilman Charlie Foulks.

Jobe said that Bromley would explore a reciprocal agreement with the City of Ludlow which allows the carts on city roads so that drivers could go through both cities if desired.

The first reading received a vote of 5-1 with Councilwoman Dixie Meyer opposing. A second reading will follow.

In other news from Wednesday's council meeting, the City will be working harder to keep the street and storm water system free of grass clippings. An ordinance that would make it illegal to toss grass clippings in the street received a first reading.

"It is something we needed to do a long time ago," said Councilman Bob France. 

Mayor Jobe said that Sanitation District 1 scored Bromley at an F rating for its storm water catch basins, mainly because of the amount of yard clippings discarded.

Meyer said that the city has bigger problems, like two troubled properties at one of the entrances to Bromley. "We have two eyesores and we're worried about grass clippings," she remarked.

Elsewhere, the city council took action to spend $1,800 removing troubled trees on Steve Tanner Street and will begin work on a new public works building.

-Michael Monks, editor & publisher