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In Northern Kentucky, "Kids Voting" is Good News for Republicans, Too

Northern Kentucky politics have trended rightward for a generation.

And if Tuesday's "Kids Voting" results are any indication, another generation is poised to continue in that direction.

Nearly 11,000 local youth (between the ages of 5 and 17) accompanied adults to the polls on Tuesday for the annual Kids Voting event. Kids Voting Northern Kentucky is a non-profit, non-partisan, all-volunteer organization dedicated to teaching young people the importance of, and to help develop the habit of, voting. 

Northern Kentucky kids cast 10,972 votes for President, approximately 1,500 more than in the 2012 presidential election where 9,490 votes were cast.

“For 17 years, Kids Voting Northern Kentucky has worked to help increase young folks awareness of the actual voting process and get in a habit of going to the polls,” said founding board member Carri Chandler. “The goal is to increase civic engagement and, ultimately, increase adult voter turnout.”

Kids voted at the same precinct locations where their parents did throughout Kenton and Campbell counties and at all of the branches of Boone County Public Library. Additionally, about 350 students volunteered to assemble ballot boxes, work polls, and count ballots.

Votes were cast on the Presidential, U.S. Senate, and 4th Congressional District races. Additionally, they weighed in on two topics, related to cursive handwriting and social media use. Republicans Donald Trump, Rand Paul, and Thomas Massie all won by comfortable margins.

Results are as follows:

President of the United States

Hillary Clinton (D): 4,562
Donald Trump (R): 5,906
Other: 504

United States Senate

Jim Gray (D): 3,343
Rand Paul (R): 4,459
Other: 34

4th Congressional District

Calvin Sidle (D): 3,680
Thomas Massie (R): 4,485
Other: 50

Questions:

1) Should cursive handwriting be taught in school?
Yes: 7,019
No: 1,192

2) Have I been taught to use social media safely?
Yes: 6,729
No: 1,987 

Voter age:

5-8 years old: 3,174

9-12 years old: 2,890

13-17 years: 671

-Staff report