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Funeral Home Going in Former Erlanger Grocery Store

The old Aldi grocery store property in Erlanger will soon be the location of a funeral home.

Kentucky Funeral Services, LLC, owned by a company out of Topeka, KS, is working on developing the site. It will be a funeral home, Erlanger economic development director Dave Hahn said at Tuesday's city council meeting.

Council member Kathy Cahill asked about work taking place on the site, prompting the conversation. Hahn explained that a funeral home is an approved use in the zone along the 4300 block of Dixie Highway.

Hahn said that there would be no crematorium at the new funeral home. 

The company applied for and received their permits from the city in June. Minimal work to the outside of the property is expected since there is already road access and a parking lot.

Other notes:

Council listened to the first reading of an ordinance which sets the new tax rate at $.33 dollars per $100 of assessed value as an ad valorem tax on real property, and $.577 per $100 as an ad valorem tax on personal property other than automobiles. These tax rates are lower than those of last year.

In state pension-related news, council passed a resolution that supports the separation of CERS from the KRS since the KRS is so badly underfunded, and the CERS is not nearly as underfunded. There is a bill in the works that would separate the two funds, but it hasn't been brought up in a regular legislative session.

Gary Wilson, a resident of Concord Avenue, brought pictures to illustrate the intense flooding that occurs in and around his house when it rains hard and long, and asked council to do something about it. He said his neighbor bricked up her garage doors, and that helped but didn't solve the problem. Wilson said he didn't want to brick up his garage doors but the water is destroying his home and his yard and he has spent thousands of dollars trying to fix it.

"I am asking for your help," he said to council. Mayor Tyson Hermes said that the public works department and the city engineer would look into the problem.

Jennifer Rose, who lives in Lakemont, told council she didn't like the two stop signs that have recently been installed at intersections of Nelson, because they are only about 150 feet apart, and that it isn't necessary.  She requested that they remove one stop sign.

City Engineer Jim Viox said that the two stop signs were put in when the new sidewalk was put in, and it was totally in the interest of pedestrian safety. He said he would look into the situation again after Rose spoke.

Duke Energy came to speak to council about changing all the meters in the city over to smart meters. Duke's Rhonda Whitaker said that the company received permission from the Public Utility Commission, so it is starting with Kenton County, then Boone County, and finally Campbell county, with work completed by September of 2018.   

Councilman Don Nicely asked if Duke was going to charge for the new meters and was told that the costs would probably be bundled into a rate raise later down the road. Councilwoman Kathy Cahill asked if the charge for meter reading would now be taken off the bill, and Whitaker said she didn't know the answer to that, but would try to find out the answer. There is an opt-out for people who really don't want the new meter, but a $25 monthly charge will be added to their bill if they don't want the new meter.

Nicely Appliance Repair was honored as the business spotlight, and three members of the company came to tell about the good things the company has done in the years it has been located in Erlanger.

Dave Leonard, Loni Reese, and Shirley Brown came to show off the accreditation certification for the Erlanger Dispatch center, telling council only thirteen dispatch centers out of 120 in the state received the certification.

Jeff Gaylor, from the American Heart Association, presented the Erlanger Fire/EMS with the Bronze award for the Mission Lifeline.

Brian Brownfied took the oath of office for firefighter/EMT at the meeting.

Written by Patricia A. Scheyer, RCN contributor