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Mayor Says State Police Visited Home After Council Complained About Mail

Bromley Mayor Donnie Jobe told City Council on Wednesday night that the Kentucky State Police had come to his residence because of a complaint filed against Jobe by three council members last December contending that he was opening their mail at the city, causing them to not receive their mail. Jobe said that he wanted it on the record that as mayor he has the right to open any mail addressed to the City of Bromley.

One of the council members that filed the complaint was Kaleb Miller whose resignation was accepted by council in April. Jobe proposed that the solution to the problem was to have any piece of mail that was addressed to the City of Bromley and a specific person be sent back to the sender so they could clarify who the mail is to go to, the city or the person. He also said that the secretary was being paid to open and sort the mail. Jobe was upset that the complaint was taken over the head of Park Hills Police Chief Cody Stanley whose department conducts police business in Bromley.

Councilwoman Dixie Meyer disagreed emphatically with the proposed solution, saying basically that it was overkill and stated that the solution was "ridiculous". She said that she was also upset with not getting mail, but did not file the complaint.

 Jobe asked, what other solution does council have?  

Councilwoman Gail Smith proposed that everyone who had mail sent to the city should not put their name, but the committee that they are on, so that if mail is sent and the council person is no longer on council, it will still be of interest to their replacement.

Jobe agreed that if mail has the city of Bromley and a committee on it it would stay and be opened and distributed as usual. If mail was addressed to a person in addition to the city, it would go back to the sender. Council voted to accept the decision.

Meanwhile, the City of Bromley has a new councilman. Tim Wartman was sworn into office on May 10 by the clerk, in the presence of Gail Smith, Charlie Foulks, and Linda Gehrum. Wartman has lived in the city 43 years, in the same house. He replaces Miller.

"I wanted to fill the vacant seat because I would like to try and help the city," Wartman said. "I have been here so long, I thought it was time to give back."

Wednesday night was Wartman's first meeting, and everyone welcomed him warmly.

Before the meeting there was a public hearing on the Municipal Road Aid program. The city has $23,053 in carryover funds from fiscal year 2015-2016, and anticipates receiving $14,988 during the upcoming fiscal year for a total of $38,041. The public was invited to give written and oral comments on the possible use of the Municipal Road Aid funds, which could come in the form of construction, reconstruction, maintenance, or repair of city streets. No one came to the public hearing. Councilman Bob France said some work had been done already on Rohman and all the alleys, and a project on West Oak is on hold.

Council voted to accept the proposed tax levy of .280 per $100 of real property value for the fiscal year of 2016-2017. The city had levied a tax  of .280 per $100 of real property value for the current fiscal year also, and that produced a gross revenue of $68,236, while this year the same tax levy is estimated to produce $69,319. 

Council also voted to accept the proposed $490,000 budget for the 2016-2017 fiscal year.   

City Attorney Kim Vocke gave a first reading of an ordinance to amending city policy on handicapped parking spaces. The amended ordinance will do away with a set fee of $100 for the parking space, and leave the amount as a discretionary fee that the chair of the road and light committee will decide on. After expenses, the amount left over will be returned to the applicant.

Council also voted to accept a three-year contract with Van Gorder and Walker for auditing services, with a $50 incremental increase each year.

Written by Patricia A. Scheyer, RCN contributor
Photo: Tim Wartman (RCN)