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SD1 Offering Free Courses on Management of Storm Water

Sanitation District 1 is partnering with the University of Kentucky Cooperative Extension to present a free brown bag lunch-and-learn series each Friday in September at SD1 offices (1045 Eaton Dr., Ft. Wright). Each session will run from noon-1 p.m., and will provide information on how to effectively manage and utilize storm water runoff on your property.

SD1’s Disconnection, Redirection, Infiltration Program (DRIP) provides homeowners with step-by-step guides to help them implement methods of managing storm water runoff in their own yards and neighborhoods. From rain barrels to rain gardens, best management practices (BMPs) to backyard stream management, everyone can help to reduce storm water pollution.

Sept. 6: Introduction to BMPs/SD1 Public Service Park Tour

Learn how to prevent storm water pollution and manage the quantity and quality of storm water runoff through the use of BMPs. Take a tour of SD1’s Public Service Park for an interactive experience exploring BMPs, including a vegetated green roof, biofiltration swale, permeable pavement, detention basin, retention basin, wetland and more.

Sept. 13: Downspout Disconnection and Rain Barrel Demo

Learn how to safely disconnect a downspout and all about rain barrels. A rain barrel is a container that connects to a downspout on your home and is used to collect and store rain water that runs off your roof. The collected rain can be used to water your yard or landscaping, which can reduce your water consumption. Disconnecting your downspout and adding a rain barrel can also help prevent the sewer system from becoming overwhelmed by excess storm water, which reduced water pollution, flooding, erosion and sewer overflows in your community.

Sept. 20: Building Rain Gardens

Learn the purpose of rain gardens, how to build one and what to plant. A rain garden is simply a garden that is designed specifically to capture, store and clean storm water runoff from your roof, driveway, patio or other hard surface. Planting rain gardens is an excellent way to control storm water runoff on your property, as they are both visually appealing and effective in decreasing flooding and erosion.

Sept. 27: Managing Backyard Streams

Gain tips for managing backyard streams and learn about UK’s free online backyard streams certification program. Many urban homeowners are not sure what to do about the stream in their backyard. Who owns it? How can you take care of it? What plants are good for your streambanks? These common questions lead to some confusing answers. The University of Kentucky designed a Backyard Streams Program to help homeowners with backyard streams protect their personal property and improve water quality and habitat. Program participants learn how fundamental stream processes are related to channel shape, how storm water impacts stream ecosystems, why stream beds and banks erode, what methods can protect and restore stream ecosystems, what permits are required to restore streams, how karst landscapes influence streams and how to begin a watershed assessment.

These brown bag lunch-and-learn sessions are free to the public, but registration is required. Register for as many lunch and learn sessions as you want at www.SD1.org/events.aspx. At each session you attend, you will also receive a ticket for a drawing for a rain barrel and assembly kit giveaway.

-Staff report