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Falcon Theatre Announces New Season of Shows in Newport

Newport's Falcon Theatre announced a new season of plays for 2021-22 after the COVID-19 pandemic disrupted the last one.

While the titles were released, Artistic Director Ted Weil said that the schedule would be assigned and announced in the upcoming weeks.

Here are the shows:

Spunk by Zora Neale Hurston (Adapted for stage by George C. Wolfe)

Hurston's evocative prose and Wolfe's unique theatrical style blend to create an evening of theater that celebrates the human spirit's ability to overcome and endure. The story glows with wit, humor, and energy and resonates with soulful music. These three tales of survival are told in the key of the blues. 

Red Speedo by Lucas Hnath

Ray has swum his way to the eve of the Olympic trials. If he makes the team, he’ll land a marketing deal with Speedo...a deal that means he’ll never need a real job. So when someone’s stash of performance-enhancing drugs is found in the locker room fridge, threatening the entire team’s Olympic fate, Ray has to quash a maelstrom of rumors...or risk losing everything. Red Speedo is a sharp and stylish play about swimming, survival of the fittest, and the American dream of a level playing field—or of leveling the field yourself.

Well by Lisa Kron

"This play is not about my mother and me," begins the character of Lisa. But, of course, it is about her mother, and her mother's extraordinary ability to heal a changing neighborhood, despite her inability to heal herself. In this "solo show with people in it," the playwright asks the provocative question: "Do we create our own illness?" The answers become highly complicated as the play spins dangerously out of control into riotously funny and unexpected territory. 

Silent Sky by Lauren Gunderson

This true story of 19th-century astronomer Henrietta Leavitt explores a woman’s place in society during a time of immense scientific discoveries, a time when women’s ideas were dismissed until men claimed credit for them. Social progress, like scientific progress, can be hard to see when one is trapped among earthly complications; Henrietta Leavitt and her female peers believe in both, and their dedication changed the way we understand both the heavens and Earth.

One other title will be announced later.

-Staff report