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Duke Energy Announces Nature Grant Recipients

The Duke Energy Foundation recently awarded grants to organizations in southwest Ohio and Northern Kentucky to fund local wildlife conservation, healthy habitats, environmental projects, and environmental programs to help communities protect their natural resources and mitigate the effects of climate change.

This funding is a long-standing investment for the Duke Energy Foundation. Over the past five years, the foundation has supported over 40 nonprofit organizations with more than $480,000 in grants to propel their environmental resiliency projects.

“We are committed to investing resources with our community partners to ensure future generations enjoy the benefits of nature and its beauty around us," said Amy Spiller, President of Duke Energy Ohio and Kentucky. "By supporting the organizations that do this important work, we can help protect and restore our natural resources as well as ensure quality environmental programs in our region."

Thomas More University’s Biology Field Station is one of this year’s recipients that will use the funding to continue its biological and water quality research located in California, Ky.

“Since 1967, students and faculty have been conducting critical water quality research on the Ohio River as a means to preserve the ecological health of the ecosystem and to safeguard human health for those utilizing the river's resources,” said Dr. Chris Lorentz, Professor of Biological Sciences and Director of the Biology Field Station. “Long-term studies such as these are invaluable to advancing the fields of science and improving the quality of life in our region. With the gracious support from Duke Energy, Thomas More is able to keep this valuable research going and protect this important natural resource.”

2021 Nature Grant Recipients

  • The Boone Conservancy. Funds will be used for the Conservancy Park Habitat Restoration and Wildlife Education Program. The program’s goals are to create healthier habitats for native plants and animals, remove invasive species, and create a viewing platform to promote education.
  • Thomas More University Biology Field Station. The primary goal of this project is to address the number of threats to our aquatic resources like water pollution, harmful algal blooms and habitat destruction. Ultimately this work will lead to insights and solutions that reduce the adverse impacts of stormwater runoff and other environmental issues.

-Staff report